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Content about GRSB2014

February 4, 2015

Can we share our story in an authentic way that's fun?

Francesca DeBiase, Vice President for Strategic Sourcing & Sustainability, Worldwide Supply Chain, McDonald’s, shares a video of people from different backgrounds and ages showing off their football (soccer) ball handling skills in surprising settings. The video is "about sharing our story in an authentic way that's fun". For beef sustainability,

February 4, 2015

The "S" word is over used and, from a farmer perspective, the word is lost in the conversations.

Karl Williams, Director, FAI Farms with Benchmark Holdings, talks about farmers can measure sustainability. He suggests the "S" word is over used and, from a farmer perspective, the word is lost in the conversations.

Mr. Williams uses the model of the three Es (Economics, Ethics, and Environment) throughout the presentation, highlighting how real farmers are accomplishing sustainability. He suggests there only needs to be a set of simple measures in order for there to be a meaningful conversation.

February 4, 2015

How is the farming of global beef coming together with the discussions around sustainability?

Sustainability is something agriculture is working to understand, measure, and take action on. This is being done from a variety of angles and groups. The 2014 Global Roundtable for Sustainable Beef (GRSB), November 2 -5, 2014, São Paulo, Brazil, provides information on the types of sustainability efforts occurring in and around beef.

February 4, 2015

We can not separate ourselves from the land; We are the land, and the land is us.

Tre’ Cates, Chief Operating Officer/CFO, Savory Institute, points out how holistic management provides the management tools to understand nature and work with it. Mr. Cates says that the opportunity is to recognize that what is happening on farms is something that can increase the livelihoods of people, through holistic management of the world’s grasslands.

February 3, 2015

How does the Sustainable Agriculture Initiative (SAI) Platform work?

Brian Lindsay, Project Leader, Beef Working Group, explains what the Sustainable Agriculture Initiative (SAI) Platform is about and how it developed. The collaboration group was created in 2002 by the food industry to promote sustainable agriculture worldwide. Mr. Lindsay shares how the definition of sustainability was developed and what members do to help support the initiative. Mr. Lindsay concludes with an outline of the SAI timeline and goals.

February 3, 2015

Can building the trust between agriculture/food companies and consumers work?

Charlie Arnot, Chief Executive Officer, Center for Food Integrity, talks about building the trust between agriculture/food companies and consumers. Mr. Arnot shares how building a social license to operate is key for companies to sustain that trust.

Mr. Arnot also covers what happens when companies loose the trust and regulation is implanted to "fix" the social license and trust shield. Mr. Arnot suggests that companies need to begin their public engagement, open their digital doors, and commit to an online and in person engagement culture throughout.

February 3, 2015

What does beef sustainability looks like in Canada?

Cheryl Copithorne-Barnes, Chair, Canadian Roundtable for Sustainable Beef, presents what beef sustainability looks like in Canada. Ms. Copithorne-Barnes details the governance and execution of the Canadian Roundtable for Sustainable Beef and how it must operate in its mission.
February 3, 2015

How can sustainability be part of soybean production?

Daniel Meyer explains what Roundtable for Responsible Soy is about and how it is being developed. This new sustainable soy initiative has developed governance, a sustainable definition, and a process to certify soy operation as sustainable. Key take aways: 1) Successful sustainability communication is tailored to different circumstances and contexts, 2) Attention to the myths of sustainability! and 3) Make the complex look simple and work on accessibility.

February 3, 2015

Dos & don'ts on doing beef lifecycle assessments.

Dr. Kim Stackhouse, Director of Sustainability Research, National Cattlemen’s Beef Association, shares the dos & don'ts discovered in the USA on doing lifecycle assessments. Dr. Stackhouse says it is important to remember that "Zero impact is not possible": there are tradeoffs and food production will result in an impact and the the goal is improvement over time.

Dr. Stackhouse concludes with the importance of having good science as a baseline for sharing beef sustainability stories over time.

February 3, 2015

Can science help consumers with respect to food and agriculture? Maybe not.

Kim Essex, Senior Vice President, Director, North American Food Practice, Ketchum, shares the stories that science does not always resonate well for consumers with respect to food and agriculture. Using the lead around the idea of "if only everyone recognized farmers' need to feed the world", Ms. Essex looks at what Food 2020 looks like and the messages that consumers hear.

Her take aways: 1) Be a listener, 2) Acknowledge concerns, and 3) Take actions that demonstrate authenticity and accountability.

February 3, 2015

How can one develop sustainability indicators?

This panel discussion with Dr. Marty Matlock (University of Arkansas), Dr. Kim Stackhouse (National Cattlemen's Beef Association), Brian Lindsay (SAI Platform), and Karin Kreider (Executive Director, ISEAL Alliance) addresses challenges in sustainable beef. Two of them: 1) how to develop sustainability indicators and, 2) what is the role of the Global Roundtable for Sustainable Beef.