media

Learn How Social Media Is Being Used by HSUS

This presentation by Carie Lewis, Director of Emerging Media, The Humane Society of the United States (HSUS), offers a great view in to how HSUS is strategic in its use of social media. While you may or may not like the HSUS, they do have a plan and know where they need to go. Everyone in agriculture needs to leverage this HSUS information to help advocate (aka agvocate) their agriculture, farm, and ranch story.

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Missing in Agricultural Media?

ag media expertise
Amongst agriculture communicators, many are familiar with webinars, online media consumption, and using a smart phone. However 62% feel they are beginners or have no expertise in search engine optimization (SEO). Additionally, 64% believe social media will be more important than email in the next several years, as a way to communicate with those in agriculture. This information is from a survey Truffle Media conducted in August 2011 (PDF).

Farmers, Ranchers, and Marketers Digital Expectations?


With respect to new and social media, across  beef,  dairy,  poultry, swine, and  crop farmers, 30% of the people spent at least 10% of their week reading watching, or listening to industry information. 50% of the people spent 20% or more of their week reading, watching, or listening to industry information. This is from a survey series conducted Q1 2010. In a survey conducted Q2 2011, 87% of swine producers listed email as their most valuable communications tool today, with newsletters and magazine at 39% and 25%.

Who and Where: 2011 Ag Media Summit

Ag Media Summit

The Ag Media Summit is coming up in New Orleans. Many of agriculture's journalists, writers, and media will be there to learn about trends in writing, technology, journalism, and agriculture.

Who will be there? The attendee list is available plus a geo map showing from where they will travel. What type of companies are being represented? The following chart highlights the industry segments.
AgMS2011AttendeeTypes-400w.jpg

What Can Animal Frontiers Tell Us?

Animal Frontiers The American Society of Animal Science (ASAS), Canadian Society of Animal Science (CSAS), and the European Federation of Animal Science (EAAP) launched a new print publication at the Joint Association Meeting (JAM) in New Orleans. Animal Frontiers aims to help bring animal science information to a broad audience with concise and focused series four times a year.
Each issue of Animal Frontiers will address a common theme with leading authors in those areas addressing various aspects of the theme. Animal Frontiers is published quarterly with an intended international readership of scientists, politicians, industry leaders and the general public seeking a scientific perspective on issues related to animal agriculture.

Digital: What Do Farmers, Ranchers, and Marketers Expect?

family-on-a-tractor.jpgWith respect to new and social media, here are some things we have observed: across beef, dairy, poultry, swine, and crop farmers, 30% of the people spent at least 10% of their week reading watching, or listening to industry information. 50% of the people spent 20% or more of their week reading, watching, or listening to industry information. This is from a survey series conducted Q1 2010.

In a survey conducted Q2 2011, 87% of swine producers listed email as their most valuable communications tool today, with newsletters and magazine at 39% and 25%.

What Are The Trends In AgChat Tweets?

AgChat Tweets

Just a quick picture to show trend of #AgChat tweets from September 2009 to December 2010. Data also available on IBM's ManyEyes.

Farmers' Ages an Indicator of Media Consumption Habit

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The percentage of US farms being run by those over 55 years old is about 57%. Conversely, 43% of farms are being operated by people under 55. Different ages have different information discover and use patterns. Pingdom posted an in-depth summary of where different aged people "hang out" on social media networks.

It’s a bit surprising that not one single site had the age group 18 – 24 as its largest, but that can be explained by this interval being a bit smaller than the other ones (it spans seven years, not 10 as most of the others). That the two oldest age groups don’t top any of the sites probably doesn’t surprise anyone, though.

For those in ag media, there is a need to continually discover and understand the metrics of their audiences. It also means taking action with those metrics to prepare for new ways of delivering and engaging that agricultural audience.

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